Huntsman and Hounds by John Theodore Fardley Kenney Image 1

Huntsman and Hounds by John Theodore Fardley Kenney (John Kenney)

Huntsman & hounds working a covert. Signed oil on board c1960.

Beautifully executed painting showing a Huntsman working his hounds in a covert.
Fine detail. He was influenced by Munnings, as you will notice - particularly in his hounds.

Image 50 x 75cm Frame H25” x W35” Image H18 ¾” x W28 ¾”

Further images available.
Please read his biography below.

PRICE CODE: D

JOHN THEODORE FARDLEY KENNEY - 1911-1972
Leicestershire-born painter of equestrian hunting subjects. He exhibited in London, New York and Chicago. He sketched horses from his earliest childhood days, and after Art School began a career as a commercial artist.

During the Second World War he served in the 44th Searchlight Regiment and later in the 121st Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment. He made many drawings during the war which are now included in the records of the Regiment at the Royal Army Museum, Woolwich.
In 1946 he illustrated Edward Bouskell-Wade’s ‘There is an Honour Likewise,’ a history of the Leicestershire Yeomanry during the second war.

Fox hunting and the Fernie were Kenney’s main interests and sources of inspiration; in 1952 he gave up commercial art and specialised entirely in sporting paintings. He had several one-man exhibitions in the provinces and his pictures were exhibited by London Galleries. He received many commissions becoming extremely popular in the USA.
In 1972 he had an exhibition at Abercrombie and Fitch, New York and Chicago. Kenney suffered chronic ill health for most of his life and therefore his travels and output were limited. In 1968 he lost the sight of one eye but continued to paint until the end of his life. He was said to be a man of great kindness, honesty and humour.
He lived at Smeeton Westerby, Leicestershire. His work makes Kenney one of the finer artists of this century despite the fact that he was comparatively unknown. He worked mainly in oil, but also in watercolour and sometimes pen and ink. His work is strong and direct, he was a tremendous draughtsman who showed a great understanding of horses and hounds.
His pictures are full of atmosphere, and the use of light and feel for colour are excellent. Influenced by the work of Munnings, he in turn was a strong influence on Neil Cawthorne whom he helped considerably in the early stages of his career.
Ref: Sally Mitchell. The Dictionary of British Equestrian Artists. Pub.1985.

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